Perennials

Perennials form a large part of our business at Moraine Gardens. We stock a wide selection spring through fall with varieties to meet all your gardening needs. From primroses and anemones for some early spring interest to asters and mums for the fall garden, we carry all shapes, sizes, and colors. We have a wide selection of hostas, ferns and astillbes for the shady garden and coneflowers and daylilies for the sunny bed. Here at greenhouse we like to keep current with new trends and try new varieties, and therefore our stock is continually changing. Because of this, and the fact that customers and landscapers are constantly in and out during the busy season, we do not keep an detailed list of everything that we carry. However, our knowledgeable nursery staff are ready and willing to answer any questions you may have and help you decide which plants are right for you. So feel free to call us or stop in today to check out everything we have!

Because of the frequency of this question, we decided to also list a collection of perennials and shrubs that we carry that are “deer resistant”. Deer are more likely to stay away from perennials that have a strong smell or textured leaves, however, if the deer are hungry enough, they will try to eat even plants that say deer resistant. That being said, here is a list of perennials that deer tend to stay away from:

Sun Perennials:

  • black eyed susans
  • echinacea (coneflowers)
  • russian sage
  • yarrow
  • monarda (bee balm)
  • catmint
  • salvia
  • lavender
  • veronica
  • shasta daisy
  • asclepias (butterfly weed)
  • poppies
  • ornamental grasses

Shade Perennials

  • Astillbe
  • Pulmonaria
  • Ferns
  • Ligularia
  • Brunnera
  • Pachysandra
  • Lamium
  • Forget-me-nots

Shrubs

  • Boxwood
  • Holly (Part Shade)
  • Ninebark
  • Diervilla
  • Potentilla
  • Spirea
  • Juniper
  • Viburnum (Part Shade)
  • Lilac

For a list of our Perennial Grasses, click here.

Employee Favorites

We’ve asked some of our employees to share their favorite perennials with you and tell you a little bit about why they love these plants so much.

Nancy ~ Coral Bells (Heuchera)
coral bells
I love Heucheras – they are hardy, low maintenance, and very versatile. There is a variety for almost any location, from sun to shade. My favorite use is to tuck them in front of and among my hostas and ferns where they add a splash of color all season long.
Ethan ~ Lenten Rose (Hellebore)
I love Hellebore because they are one of the hardiest perennials I’ve ever grown. A few summers ago, when it was really hot and dry and everything else in my east border was all dried up and yellow, my Hellebore was the only plant that stayed a rich green color all summer long without any extra watering.
Rachael ~ Sweet Summer Love Clematis
This is one of our new plants for this year. Like its much loved relative, the Sweet Autumn Clematis, Sweet Summer Love also possesses that sweet “viola-vanilla” smell that I love so much! Its flowers are also similar to the Sweet Autumn in shape but are slightly larger in size and are a beautiful cranberry-purple color. They’re easy to grow and will bloom from July-August with up to 1,000 flowers on a mature plant! I can’t wait to see how this one grows in my own garden!

2 thoughts on “Perennials

  1. Hi. I was wondering if you have any clematis vines for sale that are hardy in Wisconsin winters? If its not a problem could you send me the names so I can research and pick out the right plant?

    Thanks,
    Cory

    • Hi Cory,

      We unfortunately are all sold out of clematis. There are quite a few varieties that are hardy for Wisconsin, though! Is there a specific color that you are looking for? Jack Manii is great in this area (classic dark purple) and Sweet Autumn Clematis (white) is great, too – it blooms profusely in September. There are many other cold hardy varieties, though. Most of the ones you see in greenhouses in WI will be good for our zones. If you are not sure, though, check the tag and make sure they are good for at least zone 4. Here is a link to an article with a bunch of cold hardy clematis varieties as well! https://gardenerspath.com/plants/flowers/cold-hardy-clematis/

      I hope that helps! Let us know if you have any other questions!

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